Home > Legal Opinions tagged Further Education

  • truancy falls but more still to be done

    Emma King

    130,000 fewer pupils missed 15% of school in 2012-2013, a fall of almost a third on 2009-2010 figures. The increase of truancy fines and the reduction in time to pay, along with the threshold for persistent absence lowered from 20% to 15% are both key contributing factors to the improving figures. With long standing evidence […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • free school meals for all a threat to pupil premium?

    Emma King

    The problem with pupil premium is that schools do not receive the payments automatically. Parents have to register their claim in order for the school to receive the payments and this is a major hurdle faced by some schools. With current funding of £953 per year per child, parents failing to register can result in […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • admissions lottery

    Emma King

    More schools and academies are using ‘lottery’ admissions systems in favour of the traditional geographical catchment areas. Whilst the aim, I am sure, is to ensure that access to top performing schools is not limited to those who can afford to live near the schools, a shift to this approach may place further burden upon a […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • Mesothelioma claims no longer exempt from LAPSO effect

    Bridget Tatham

    It seems that the government is not for turning. Having revoked the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act (LASPO) exemption for mesothelioma cases last month, bringing this unfortunate tranche of claims into line with all claims from July 2014, the Justice Minister Shailesh Vara has announced that the MOJ will press on. The […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • mesothelioma case reaches a novel, but far reaching conclusion!

    Bridget Tatham

    Mrs Haxton claimed under the Fatal Accidents Act (FAA) for damages following the death of her husband from mesothelima. Unfortunately she was also diagnosed with the disease, having washed her husband’s asbestos covered overalls throughout the years. Her life expectancy was no more than 6-12 months. Her FAA claim, unsurprisingly was reduced by that period […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • expiry of fixed-term contracts and duty to collectively consult

    Elish Kennedy

    The expiry of a fixed term contract will amount to a dismissal which may be due to redundancy or ‘some other substantial reason’, but following the Court of Session’s decision in University College Union v University of Stirling, it will not necessarily be the case that the dismissal will count towards the numbers when determining […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • what does 2014 hold in store for UTCs?

    Hayley Roberts

    The Telegraph reports that the Duke of York is enthusiastic about the ‘UTC movement’ after opening a new University Technical College in Reading. However, only a few months ago it was revealed there is insufficient demand for UTC places. Should the programme expand rapidly over the next few years without waiting for the level of […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • grammar school extensions rejected

    Jamie Otter

    Two Kent grammar schools’ applications to extend their grammar school provision were rejected by the DfE because they effectively created new schools (which is currently against the law), rather than extended current provision (which isn’t). It was revealing that the Kent grammar school bids were rejected on technical (the two applicants were single sex and […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • to trade or not trade

    Nick MacKenzie

    It is clear that schools and academies will continue to face substantial pressures on their finances in the medium term with flat-lining income at best on one hand and rising costs and pressures to raise standards and support other schools on the other. What is less clear is how schools and academies will look to […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • good governance – at what price?

    Vicki Hair

    The question of paying governors of schools and colleges has always been a thorny one. Historically governors have been expected to contribute their time and expertise as governors without pay, except for out of pocket expenses. But with the growing emphasis placed by Ofsted and the public on good governance, are we asking the UK’s […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • e-safety up to scratch?

    Emma King

    A primary school survey has flagged concerning statistics regarding children’s use of the internet. With 20% of children meeting someone in person after they met online and the same figure never having received training on safe internet usage – are school’s doing enough to protect their pupils online? Ofsted are continually pushing for e-safety to […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • free school meals for infants

    Emma King

    Nick Clegg has announced that from September 2014, all infants (reception to year two) will be eligible for free school meals. Praised by parents, unions and National Children’s Bureau, the change will save parents on average £400 per year per child. The aim is to teach healthy eating habits and raise academic standards but what […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • is legislation the answer to veils in schools?

    Richard Freeth

    The debate over wearing veils in the school context has been raised again with a clear statement that wearing a veil is not beneficial in the school context as it provides a barrier to learning as teachers need to see facial expressions in order to gauge the learning experience. The argument follows on wider concerns […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • do Ofsted inspections work?

    Emma King

    A senior academic has criticised Ofsted’s methods. Professor Robert Coe, has commented that there is no evidence that lesson observations lead to valid Ofsted judgements. With variables such as; subject matter, time of day and students’ behaviour, Professor Coe has questioned the consistency of observation ratings, suggesting that busy students and an ordered classroom do […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • new national curriculum finalised

    Emma King

    The new national curriculum was published by the Department for Education yesterday, to be introduced in September 2014. The initial version published in February failed to make the grade, forcing the DfE to go back to the drawing board, but have they gone far enough? The introduction of sock-darning to the design and technology curriculum […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • secondary schools are neglecting child protection

    Emma King

    The Children’s Commissioner reports child protection is a “neglected area of practice” for many secondary schools, with staff often feeling unable to adequately deal with child protection issues. ‘Feeling Safe, Keeping Safe’ highlighted that schools with a “bottom to top” approach continually have good track records on child protection. Training all staff, including catering staff and […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • careers guidance at what cost?

    Laura Richards

    A report carried out by Ofsted has triggered further criticism of the careers guidance being provided to young people. The Government introduced a duty on schools to provide independent and impartial careers advice and also issued statutory guidance for schools to have regard to. The change in legislation and current guidance reflected the Government’s desire […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • basic skills at forefront of policy review

    Richard Freeth

    With the new school term starting this week, new policy announcements have been made to support the ongoing push for higher educational standards and increase the employability of school leavers. The requirement to be in education or training until 17 hits this September and will be further extended to 18 in 2015. A further change […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • free schools – diversity in action?

    Richard Freeth

    Back in 2006, the Education & Inspections Act placed a duty on local authorities to increase choice and diversity in their area. That duty may, to a degree, be satisfied by the free schools programme and the increased choice of schools available as a result. Clear evidence of this is the new Greek Orthodox Secondary […]

    Read our legal opinion.

  • demand for maths and science teachers grows

    Hayley Roberts

    A shortage of maths and science teachers may result in A-Levels being taught by unqualified teachers according to the Telegraph. Some blame the shortage on stagnant wages and the continual negative press around the teaching profession. So what can schools and academies do to make sure they get first pick? Making the most of three […]

    Read our legal opinion.

Archives

Sectors

Opinions tagged as...

Oliver Sweeney government personal injury Social Care Laura Richards adult safeguarding Browne Jacobson LLP NHS child protection free schools further education trade marks Sarah Erwin-Jones Richard Freeth Mark Blois academies schools Browne Jacobson litigation copyright Gemma Steele Nichola Evans Ofsted Public Sector employment education Claims teachers Dai Durbridge Department for Education local authorities Hayley Roberts Brands Fiona Carter Intellectual Property Court of Appeal employment tribunal Richard Nicholas advertising James Arrowsmith